What does Boise look like through the eyes of local artists?

 

150 Sunsets

What does Boise look like through the eyes of local artists?
By Karen Bubb, Public Arts Manager

In 2012, for 150 days photographer Ellen Crosby stood on a trail of the Military Reserve above St. Luke’s Hospital and photographed the same Kentucky coffee tree at sunset. Recording the same place at the same moment 150 times was her personal way to commemorate Boise’s Sesquicentennial. She captured the beauty in the small details of everyday life. Crosby combined these 150 images in a photomontage, which is on view at Boise City Hall, 3rd floor.

This is one of 24 works by 13 artists that the City of Boise purchased in 2014 to add to the Boise Visual Chronicle, a collection of artworks that reflect the diverse expression and concerns of artists responding to life in Boise. The collection originated in 1996 with funding from Greater Boise Auditorium District (GBAD) and then Capital City Development Corporation (CCDC) who purchased work for the collection from 1998 – 2005. Since then, new works are added biennially with funding from the City of Boise’s Percent-for-Art program. Currently the collection includes 129 works, valued at $133,650, all by Idaho artists.

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Arts & History Celebrates National Poetry Month

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The Academy of American Poets established April as National Poetry Month in 1996. That same year, President Bill Clinton proclaimed National Poetry Month on April 1 to “…celebrate not only the unsurpassed body of literature produced by our poets in the past, but also the vitality and diversity of voices reflected in the works of today’s American poetry…”. Ever since, the Academy of American Poets has encouraged participation in National Poetry Month through public proclamations, media attention, and individual and collective projects and initiatives to promote awareness of and appreciation for poetry’s important place in our culture.

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150 YEARS OF CELEBRATING

Having the BOISE 150 celebration over, we thought it would be fitting to take a look back at a few of Boise’s past anniversaries.

150 Years – 1863 

Boise's 1863 Plat
Photo Courtesy ISHS

Boise’s founding fathers founded the city when they platted its first 10 blocks in July 1863. Nearby, Fort Boise was already taking shape. Fort Boise was initially founded as an Hudson’s Bay Company outpost for fur traders in 1834 near Parma on the Boise River, but closed in 1855 due to hostilities between Oregon Trail travelers and Native Americans.  In 1863 the military received approval to construct a new military fort in the Boise area to protect the influx of miners going to the Boise Basin mother lode, and sent Major Pinckney Lugenbeel to select the fort’s site. A group of locals, including farmers and merchants as well as military men, joined together at the Ritchey-Davis cabin on July 7, 1863. There they completed the task of platting the initial boundaries of Boise City. The city included ten blocks, split evenly on each side of Main Street.
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A BOISE 150 Thank You

logo_webAs we begin wrapping up Boise’s Sesquicentennial year the Department of Arts and History would like to extend our deepest thanks and sincerest gratitude to the many Boise City Departments for their invaluable contributions in helping us make 2013 a complete success.

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Boise 150: Oregon Trail Memorial Bridge

A finished light post installed on Oregon Trail Memorial Bridge's railing.

A finished light post installed on Oregon Trail Memorial Bridge’s railing.

While the BOISE 150 commemoration is beginning to wind down, its legacy will not. BOISE 150 will likely be remembered for its variety of lectures, tours, and parties, but it’s also important to note the lasting effects this year’s projects will have on Boise. In addition to public art pieces throughout the city, BOISE 150 also sponsored the partial restoration of one of Boise’s historic landmarks, The Oregon Trail Memorial Bridge. The following is excerpts of an interview conducted with Greg Marsters of Custom Plaster LLC, the man heading the restoration of the Bridge’s lighting fixtures. Continue reading

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Dia de los Muertos

DdlM_skullsFor indigenous Mesoamericans the end of the harvest season brought a celebration of, and a communion with ancestors that had passed through this life and into the afterlife.  After the Spanish conquest of Mexico in 1519, the month-long celebration was condensed into the few days that coincided with Christianized European Holy Days that celebrated the ancestral dead, All Hallows’ Eve, All Saints; Day, and All Souls’ Day between October 31, November 1, and November 2.

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Relyea Funeral Home

Relyea_MH Cemetery gatesIn 1952 there were three funeral homes in downtown Boise when Russell A. Relyea moved from his Main Street location to a new funeral chapel and mortuary he built just past the Morris Hill Cemetery gates.[1]  The new chapel was built on a three acre orchard at the corner of Latah and Morris Hill Road.[2]

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Performance Buildings of Boise’s Past

The Columbia Theater, 1892. ISHS: 73-98-23

The Columbia Theater, 1892. ISHS: 73-98-23

Hardly a day goes by that one cannot find some form of entertainment in Boise. From lectures and sports games to concerts and wine tastings, the choices are endless. But, perhaps the oldest form of entertainment in Boise is performance. In Boise’s early years, several performance buildings were constructed to host live performances of operas, plays, and musical events. As film became more popular, many of these early buildings either adapted by adding movie screens or were replaced by newer venues built specifically for film. This month, we’ll be looking back at some of Boise’s most popular performance buildings from The Columbia to open air venues such as Riverside Theater.

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Early Lumber Companies of Boise

 

The Boise Plaza at the 1100 block of Jefferson was built in 1971, but the history of the first owner of the building, Boise Cascade, dates back to the early 1900s.The predecessor to Boise Cascade, the Payette Lumber & Manufacturing Company was organized in early 1903. The company’s principal office was located on the Noble Block at 10th and Main Streets and became a substantial presence in Boise. According to a Statesman article from January 30, 1903, the promoters of the company were among the largest lumber operators in the United States. Upon their arrival the large lumber company began to affect the landscape around Boise.  For example, the placement of mills led to the construction of a road between Horseshoe Bend and Boise in the early 1900s.

The company changed its name in 1914 with the merger and purchase of The Barber Lumber Company. The Barber Lumber company had established the town of Baberton, located in south Boise near the present day Marianne Williams Park. The merger was a product of legal troubles. According to historian Brandi Burns, “The Barber Lumber Company faced some major challenges in its early years, including accusations of timber fraud in 1906-1907,”[1]  and these problems led to litigation which in turn led to the eventual merger between Barber Lumber Company and Payette Lumber & Manufacturing Company.

2630_BarberMill_ISHS  Barber Mill (ISHS-2360)

 

Payette Lumber & Manufacturing Company, however, also faced legal problems in the early 1900s. In 1907, Payette Lumber & Manufacturing Company faced a fraud lawsuit, with negotiations and litigation lasting several years. In 1912, the company lost substantially in the case against plaintiff Mollie Conklin when the company was found guilty of conducting a deceptive business transaction.

By 1914, with the purchase of the Barber Lumber Company, Payette Lumber & Manufacturing Company became Boise-Payette Lumber Company. This merger spurred optimism throughout the city, and according to a Statesman article from January 1, 1914 “the last doubt was removed as to the future of Boise as a center of commerce and industry.” Also, in the 1910s, Boise- Payette Lumber Company employed many women in their box manufacturing factory at Barberton. Women used saws and wood printing equipment to make the boxes, and earned decent wages for women at the time. Under new ownership, the mill and company town of Barberton thrived until the 1930s. In 1934 Boise- Payette Lumber abandoned their claims to the Barber mill and transferred their employees to Emmett.

In 1957 Boise-Payette Lumber Company merged with Cascade Lumber Company and by 1971 they had moved into their new headquarters at 1111 W. Jefferson. The impressive structure was designed by the internationally renowned architect firm of Skimore, Owings, & Merrill, founded in 1936. The firm also designed the Hancock and Willis (former Sears Tower) in Chicago. Besides their work in Chicago the firm is known for the Alcoa Building (1964) in San Francisco and the Business Men’s Assurance Company of America (1963) in Kansas City, Missouri. The building was remodeled in 2006 after ownership shifted to Rafanelli and Nahas. It was also in 2006 that the building became known as Boise Plaza.

Boise Cascade CCDC Boise Buildings 1974Boise Plaza circa 1974

 

 

 

 


[1] Boise City Department of Arts & History, Remnants of Boise, (2013) 118.

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26 Years of the Whole-Art Experience at the Stewart Gallery

For the last 26 years the Stewart Gallery has been perfecting the whole-art experience in Boise, what curator Stephanie Wilde explains has been an attempt to bring galleries and performing arts together “for a more vibrant art community in Idaho’s capitol.”

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